Tuesday - September 30, 2014
Governor, President Slip in New Poll
Written by Staff Reports   
Friday, 20 September 2013 01:36

ELON -- More than half of registered voters in North Carolina disapprove of President Barack Obama's job performance and nearly as many are unhappy with the way their own governor has handled his role leading the state, according to the latest Elon University Poll.

The dissatisfaction reflects the way North Carolinians view the direction of the country and the state. Seventy percent believe the United States is on the "wrong track" and 59 percent say the same for North Carolina itself.

The live-caller, dual frame (landline and cell phone) survey of 701 registered voters was conducted Sept. 13-16, 2013, and has a margin of error of 3.7 percentage points.

"The president, governor and the General Assembly have all seen a substantial decline in their job approval since the last Elon University Poll in April of this year," said Assistant Professor Kenneth Fernandez, director of the Elon University Poll.

Fifty-one percent of poll respondents said they disapprove of the way Obama is handling his job as president, and the numbers break along party lines as 79 percent of Democrats approve of the president compared to just 6 percent of Republicans.

Race also factored into support. Eighty-three percent of African-American respondents approve of Obama's performance compared to 26 percent of whites do. A much higher number of whites (63 percent) said they disapprove of Obama, whereas just 8 percent of blacks disapprove.

Forty-six percent expressed disapproval of North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's performance, and as with the president, the governor's numbers also hinge on party affiliation. Fifty-eight percent of Republicans approve of McCrory's job performance compared to 18 percent of Democrats.

Nearly twice as many whites (42 percent) approve of McCrory as do African-Americans (22 percent). More men (41 percent) indicate support for the governor than do women (32 percent).

And just over a quarter of respondents (26 percent) expect the economy to get better over the next year. Twenty-nine percent believe it will get worse and 42 percent say they expect it to remain about the same.

 

 
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